Microservices, SOA, Reuse and Replaceability

Unicorn

While it’s not as elusive as the unicorn, the concept of reuse tends to be talked about more often talked about than seen. Over the years, object-orientation, design patterns, and services have all held out the promise of reuse of either code or at least, design. Similar claims have been made regarding microservices.

Reuse is a creature of extremes. Very fine grained components (e.g. the classes that make up the standard libraries of Java and .Net) are highly reusable but require glue code to coordinate their interaction in order to yield something useful. This will often be the case with microservices, although not always; it is possible to have very small services with few or no dependencies on other services (it’s important to remember, unlike libraries, services generally share both behavior and data.). Coarse grained components, such as traditional SOA services, can be reused across an enterprise’s IT architecture to provide standard high-level interfaces into centralized systems for other applications.

The important thing to bear in mind, though, is that reuse is not an end in itself. It can be a means of achieving consistency and/or efficiency, but its benefits come from avoiding cost and duplication rather than from the extra usage. Just as other forms of reuse have had costs in addition to benefits, so it is with microservices as well.

Anything that is reused rather than duplicated becomes a dependency of its client application. This dependency relationship is a form of coupling, tying the two codebases together and constraining the ability of the dependency to change. Within the confines of an application, it is generally better for reuse to emerge. Inter-application reuse will require more coordination and tend to be more deliberately designed. As with most things, there is no free lunch. Context is required to determine whether the trade is a good one or not.

Replaceability is, in my opinion, just as important, if not more so, than reuse. Being able to switch from one dependency to another (or from one version of a dependency to another) because that dependency has its own independent lifecycle and is independently deployed enables a great deal of flexibility. That flexibility enables easier upgrades (rolling migration rather than a big bang). Reducing the friction inherent in migrations reduces the likelihood of technical debt due to inertia.

While a shared service may well find more constraints with each additional client, each client can determine how much replaceability is appropriate for itself.

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3 thoughts on “Microservices, SOA, Reuse and Replaceability

  1. To clarify, where I stated “services generally share both behavior and data” above, what I was trying to convey was “services generally share both behavior and data with their client, rather than behavior alone“…sorry for any confusion.

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  2. Pingback: Microservice Principles, Technical Debt, and Legacy Systems | Form Follows Function

  3. Pingback: Microservices – Sharpening the Focus | Form Follows Function

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