Who Needs Architects? Well, Nobody Needs this Kind

The question above came up while recording SPaMCast 357 with Tom Cagley, and it’s an extremely important one. The post we were discussing, “Who Needs Architects? Because YAGNI Doesn’t Scale”, is one of many discussing the need for architectural design in software development. While I’m firmly convinced that the need is real, it should also be realized that there is a real danger in unilaterally imposing the design on a team.

Tom’s question about an “aristocracy of architects” was taken from his post “Re-Read Saturday: The Mythical Man-Month, Part 4 Aristocracy, Democracy and System Design”, part of a series in which he is reviewing Frederick Brooks’ The Mythical Man-Month. In the essay reviewed in this post, “Aristocracy, Democracy and System Design”, Brooks discussed the importance and value of conceptual integrity (i.e. a cohesive, unified design) to software systems. While I agree wholeheartedly that both architectural design and someone (or more than one someone) responsible for that design is necessary, I disagree that establishing an aristocracy is beneficial or even necessary. In fact, the portion labeled “Reality” on the graphic in Kelly Abuelsaad‘s tweet below, although talking about imposter syndrome, also illustrates why dictating design can be a bad idea.

One can certainly influence, even control the architecture of a system via a mandate. The problem with being given control is that no one can give effectiveness to go with it. As such, it’s brittle, subject to the limitations of the person given the authority and the compliance of those implementing the system. This brittleness exists even when the architect stays within their level of detail. Combining a dictatorial style with Big Design Up Front all but ensures failure.

In my experience, a participative, collaborative style of design yields better designs. In addition to benefiting from a variety of skills and experience, it also engenders greater understanding and ownership across the team. Arrogance, on the other hand, can be costly.

I firmly believe that a product will benefit from having someone whose focus is the cross-cutting, architecturally significant concerns. I also believe that part of that job is teaching and mentoring as well as listening to the rest of the team so that architectural awareness permeates the entire team. There are many aspects to being an architect, but being a dictator should not be one of them.

Updated 4/8/2016 to fix a broken link.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s