Architecture Corner: Fame on Social Media – Seven Deadly Sins of IT

Episode 3 of this season of Architecture Corner is out (I made a guest appearance in episode 1, “Good at Innovation”). In this installment, Chris the CEO is having trouble with a new sin.

What happens when the CEO envies the social media presence of his competitors and decides to buy some followers?

Innovation in Inner Space

KGL dragoons at the Battle of Garcia Hernandez

 

Long-time readers know that I have a rather varied set of interests and that I’ve got a “thing” for history, particularly military history. Knowing that, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that I was recently reading an article titled “Cyber is the fourth dimension of war” (ground, sea and air being the first three dimensions). It’s not a bad article, but it is mistaken. Cyberwar is the fifth dimension of war. The first dimension, today and for all of time past, is the human mind. Contests are won or lost, not on some field of battle, virtual or physical, but in the minds of the combatants. For example, if you believe you’ve lost, then you have.

The painting shown above illustrates this nicely. During the Napoleonic period, infantry that was charged by cavalry would form a square, presenting a hedge of bayonets to all sides. Horses, being intelligent creatures, will not impale themselves on pointy things, thus the formation provides protection to the infantry who were free to fire at the encircling cavalry. Charging disciplined, unbroken infantry was a losing proposition for the cavalry under almost all circumstances. Note the use of “almost”.

At the Battle of García Hernández, July 1812, something unusual happened. One French formation was late in firing, and a wounded horse ran blindly into the square, breaking it up. The attacking British (Hannoverian, to be precise) cavalry rode into the gap and forced the surrender of the French infantry that comprised it. This, of course, was simply a matter of physics. However, two further squares broke up when charged due to the effect of what happened to the first one on their morale. Believing they were beaten, they failed to maintain cohesion and their anticipated defeat became a reality.

So, what’s the point?

Greger Wikstrand and I have been trading posts on the topic of innovation since late 2015. Greger’s latest, “Spring clean your mind”, deals with the concepts of infowar and propaganda (aka “fake news”). This is another example of what Greger’s written about in the past, a concept he dubbed black hat innovation: “Whenever there is innovation or invention there is also misuse”.

Whether you call it black hat innovation or abuse cases (my term), it’s a concept we need to be aware of. It is a concept that affect us, not just as technologists, but as ordinary human beings. We need to be aware of the potential for active abuse. We also need to be aware of the potential for problems that caused by things that make our life more convenient or more pleasant:

This isn’t to say that Facebook is some evil empire, but that we need to bear some responsibility for not allowing ourselves to become trapped in an echo chamber:

It’s something we need to take responsibility for. We can’t hope for a technological deus ex machina to bail us out. As Tim Bass recently noted on his Cyberspace Event Processing Blog:

The big “AI” processing “pie in the sky” plan for cyber defense we all read about is not going to work “as advertised” because we cannot program machines to solve problems that we cannot solve ourselves. There is no substitute for the advancement and development of the human mind to solve complex problems. Delegating the task of “thinking” to machines is doomed to fail, and fail “big time”. It seems like humanity has, in a manner of speaking, “given up” on humans developing the intelligence to manage and defend cyberspace, so they have decided to turn it all over to machines.

Wrong approach!

The right approach, in my opinion, is to be intentional and active in learning. Consuming information should not be a matter of sitting back and shoveling it in, but one of filtering, testing, and appraising. How much time do you spend reading viewpoints you absolutely disagree with? How much time do you spend exploring information?

In 1645, as he was looking back at his long and successful career as a samurai, where a single loss often meant death, Miyamoto Musashi concluded that although rigorous sword practice was essential, it wasn’t enough. At the end of the first chapter of A Book of Five Rings, he also admonishes aspiring warriors to “Cultivate a wide variety of interests in the arts” and “Be knowledgable in a wide variety of occupations.”

Similarly, Boyd, who was was a keen student of Musashi, described his method as looking across a wide variety of fields — “domains” he called them — searching for underlying principles, “invariants.” He would then experiment with syntheses involving these principles until he evolved a solution to the problem he was working on. Because they involved bits and pieces from a variety of domains, he called these syntheses “snowmobiles” (skis, handlebar from a bicycle, etc.)

 

Perception is critical. We are made or unmade, less by our circumstances and more by our perception of them. Companies that have suffered disruptions have done so not because they were unable to respond, but because they either believed themselves invulnerable or believed themselves incapable. Likewise, as individuals, we have control over what information we expose ourselves to and how we manage that exposure.

Sense-making is a critical skill that requires active involvement. The passive get passed by.

[Painting of the battle of Garcia Hernandez by Adolf Northen, housed in the Landesmuseum Hannover. Photo by Michael Ritter via Wikimedia Commons]

What Customer-Centric Looks Like

My last post, “Defense Against the Dark Art of Disruption”, went into some detail about notable failures in customer-experience for 2016. This week, however, I ran across a counter-example (h/t to Tim Worstall) showing that a little social media awareness and a customer-centric culture can make magic:

A baby products company is launching a special run of ‘little blue cups’ for a 13-year-old boy with autism following a global appeal by his father.

Ben Carter, from Devon, will only drink from a blue Tommee Tippee cup, prompting father Marc to put out an appeal on social media after becoming concerned the cup was wearing out.

Ben would refuse drinks that were not in the cup and had been to hospital with severe dehydration.
His father, tweeting as @GrumpyCarer, prompted people across the world to look through their cupboards for identical cups or to spread the #cupforben message. His request was retweeted more than 12,000 times.

Tommee Tippee, based in Northumberland, said it was nearly 20 years since it had manufactured that product, but has now rediscovered the design and found the mould used to make the two-handled originals, stored in a usable condition in China.

It has said it will make a run of 500 cups to ensure ‘that Ben has a lifetime supply and that his family won’t ever have to worry about finding another cup’.

 

While I don’t know what it cost them to find the molds and run a one-off batch of cups, I suspect that the value of the positive global media coverage should substantially offset it. As a father, I know that the gesture was priceless.

Win-win.

Twitter, Timelines, and the Open/Closed Principle

Consider this Tweet for a moment. I’ll be coming back to it at the end.

In my last post, I brought up Twitter’s rumored changes to the timeline feature as a poor example of customer awareness in connection with an attempt to innovate. The initial rumor set off a storm of protest that brought out CEO Jack Dorsey to deny (sort of) that the timeline will change. Today, the other shoe dropped, the timeline will change (sort of):

Essentially, it will be a re-implementation of the “While You Were Away” feature with an opt-out:

In the “coming weeks,” Twitter will turn on the feature for users by default, and put a notification in the timeline when it does, Haq says. But even then, you’ll be able to turn it off again.

Of course, Twitter’s expectation is that most people will like the timeline tweak—or at least not hate it—once they’re exposed to it. “We have the opt-out because we also prioritize user control,” Haq says. “But we do encourage people to give it a chance.”

So, what does this have to do with the Open/Closed Principle? The Wikipedia article for it contains a quote from Bertrand Meyer’s Object-Oriented Software Construction (emphasis is mine):

A class is closed, since it may be compiled, stored in a library, baselined, and used by client classes. But it is also open, since any new class may use it as parent, adding new features. When a descendant class is defined, there is no need to change the original or to disturb its clients.

Just as change to the code of class may disturb its clients, change to user experience of a product may disturb the clientele. Sometimes extension won’t work and change must take place. As it turns out, the timeline has been extended with optional behavior rather than changed unconditionally as was rumored.

Some thoughts:

  • Twitter isn’t the only social media application out there with a timeline for updates. Perhaps that chronological timeline (among other features) provides some value to the user base?
  • Assuming that value and the risk of upsetting the user base if that value was taken away, wouldn’t it have been wise to communicate in advance? Wouldn’t it have been even wiser to communicate when the rumor hit?

Innovation will involve change, but not all change is necessarily innovative. Understanding customer wants and needs is a good first step to identifying risky changes to user experience (whether real or just perceived). I’d argue this is even more pronounced when you consider that Twitter’s user base is really its product. Twitter’s customers are advertisers and data consumers who want and need an engaged, growing user base to view promoted Tweets and generate usage data.

Returning to the Tweet at the beginning of this post. Considering the accuracy of that recommendation, would it be reasonable to think turning over your timeline to their algorithms might degrade your user experience?

#ShadowSocialMedia or Why Won’t People Use the Product the Way They’re Supposed to

Scott Berkun dislikes the way people are using images to bypass Twitter’s 140 character limit:

His point is very valid, but:

Which is the issue. Sometimes there’s a need to go beyond that limit. Sure, you can chunk your thoughts up across multiple tweets, but users find it burdensome to respect Twitter’s constraint on the amount of text per tweet. Constrained customers, assuming they stick with a product, tend to come up with “creative” solutions to that product’s shortcomings that reflect what they value. The customers’ values may well conflict with the developers’. When “conflict” and “customer” are in the same sentence, there’s generally a problem..

Berkun’s response to @honatwork‘s rebuttal nearly captures the issue:

I say “nearly”, because Twitter was built long before 2015. The problem is that it’s 2015 and Twitter has not evolved to meet a need that clearly exists.

In the IT world, it’s common to hear terms like “Shadow IT” or “Rogue IT”. Both refer to users (i.e. customers) going beyond the pale of approved tools and techniques to meet a need. This poses a problem for IT in that the customer’s solution may not incorporate things that IT values and retrofitting those concerns later is far more difficult. Taking a “products, not projects” approach can minimize the need for customer “creativity”, for in-house IT and external providers.

Trying to hold back the tide just won’t work, because the purpose of the system is to meet the customers’ needs, not respect the designers’ intent.