Monolithic Applications and Enterprise Gravel

Pebbles

It’s been almost a year since I’ve written anything about microservices, and while a lot has been said on that subject, it’s one I still monitor to see what new pops up. The opening of a blog post that I read last week caught my attention:

Coined by Melvin Conway in 1968, Conway’s Law states: “Any organization that designs a system will produce a design whose structure is a copy of the organization’s communication structure.” In software development terms, Conway’s Law suggests that a given team will build apps that mirror the team’s organizational structure. Siloed functional teams produce siloed application architectures.

The result is a monolith: A massive application whose functionality is crammed into a few crowded parts. Scaling a simple pattern to the enterprise level often results in a monolith.

None of this is wrong, per se, but in reading it, one could come to a wrong conclusion. Siloed functional teams (particularly where the culture of the organization encourages siloed business units) produce siloed application architectures that are most likely monoliths. From an enterprise IT architecture aspect, though, the result is not monolithic. Googling the definition of “monolithic”, we get this:

mon·o·lith·ic
ˌmänəˈliTHik/
adjective
  1. formed of a single large block of stone.
  2. (of an organization or system) large, powerful, and intractably indivisible and uniform.
    “rejecting any move toward a monolithic European superstate”
    synonyms: inflexible, rigid, unbending, unchanging, fossilized
    “a monolithic organization”

Rather than “a single large block of stone”, we get gravel. The architecture of the enterprise’s IT isn’t “large, powerful, and intractably indivisible and uniform”. It may well be large, but its power in relation to its size will be lacking. Too much effort is wasted reinventing wheels and maintaining redundant data (most likely with no real sense of which set of data is authoritative). Likewise, while “intractably indivisible” isn’t a virtue, being intractable while also lacking cohesion is worse. Such an IT architecture is a foundation built on shifting sand. Lastly, whether the EITA is uniform or not (and I would give good odds that it’s not), is irrelevant given the other negative aspects. Under the circumstances, worrying about uniformity would be like worrying about whether the superstructure of the Titanic had a fresh paint job.

Does this mean that microservices are the answer to having an effective EITA? Hardly.

There are prerequisites for being able to support a microservice architecture; table stakes, if you will. However, the service-oriented mindset can be of value whether it’s applied as far down as the intra-application level (i.e. microservices – it is an application architecture pattern) or inter-application (the more traditional SOA). Where the line is drawn depends on the context of the application(s) and their ecosystem. What can be afforded and supported are critical aspects of the equation at all levels.

What is necessary for an effective EITA is a full-stack approach. Governance and data architecture in particular are important aspects to consider. The goal is consistent, intentional alignment across all levels (enterprise, EITA, solution, and application), promoting a cohesive architecture throughout, not a top-down dictatorship.

Large edifices that last are built from smaller pieces that fit together on purpose.

Advertisement

Microservices, Monoliths, and Conflicts to Resolve

Two tweets, opposites in position, and both have merit. Welcome to the wonderful world of architecture, where the only rule is that there is no rule that survives contact with reality.

Enhancing resilience via redundancy is a technique with a long pedigree. While microservices are a relatively recent and extreme example of this, they’re hardly groundbreaking in that respect. Caching, mirroring, load-balancing, etc. has been with us a long, long time. Redundancy is a path to high availability.

Centralization (as exemplified by monolithic systems) can be a useful technique for simplification, increasing data and behavioral integrity, and promoting cohesion. Like redundancy, it’s a system design technique older than automation. There was a reason that “all roads lead to Rome”. Centralization provides authoritativeness and, frequently, economies of scale.

The problem with both techniques is that neither comes without costs. Redundancy introduces complexity in order to support distributing changes between multiple points and reconciling conflicts. Centralization constrains access and can introduce a single point of failure. Getting the benefits without the incurring the costs remains a known issue.

The essence of architectural design is decision-making. Given that those decisions will involve costs as well as benefits, both must be taken into account to ensure that, on balance, the decision achieves its aims. Additionally, decisions must be evaluated in the greater context rather than in isolation. As Tom Graves is fond of saying “things work better when they work together, on purpose”.

This need for designs to not only be internally optimal, but also optimized for their ecosystem means that these, as well as other principles, transcend the boundaries between application architecture, enterprise IT architecture, and even enterprise architecture. The effectiveness of this fractal architecture of systems of systems (both automated and human) is a direct result of the appropriateness of the decisions made across the full range of the organization to the contexts in play.

Since there is no one context, no rule can suffice. The answer we’re looking for is neither “microservice” nor “monolith” (or any other one tactic or technique), but fit to purpose for our context.