Law of Unintended Consequences – Security Edition

Bank Vault

More isn’t always better. When it comes to security, more can even be worse.

As the use of encryption has increased, management of encryption keys has emerged as a pain point for many organizations. The amount of encrypted data passing through corporate firewalls, which has doubled over the last year, poses a severe challenge to security professionals responsible for protecting corporate data. The mechanism that’s intended to protect information in transit does so regardless of whether the transmission is legitimate or not.

Greater complexity, which means greater inconvenience, can lead to decreased security. Usability increases security by increasing compliance. Alarm fatigue means that as the number of warnings increase, so does the likelihood of their being ignored

Like any design issue, security should be approached from a systems thinking viewpoint (at least in my opinion). Rather than a one-dimensional, naive approach, a holistic one that recognizes and deals with the interrelationships is more likely to get it right. Thinking solely in terms of actions while ignoring the reactions that result from them hampers effective decision-making.

To be effective, security should be comprehensive, coordinated, collaborative, and contextual.

Comprehensive security is security that involves the entire range of security concerns: application, network, platform (OS, etc.), and physical. Strength in one or more of these areas means little if only one of the others is fatally compromised. Coordination of the efforts of those responsible for these aspects is essential to ensure that the various security enhance rather than hinder security. This coordination is better achieved via a collaborative process that reconciles the costs and benefits systemically than a prescriptive one imposed without regard to those factors. Lastly, practices should be tailored to the context of the problem at hand. Value at risk and amount of exposure are two factors that should help determine the effort expended. Putting a bank vault door on the garden shed not only wastes money, but also hinders security by taking those resources away from an area of greater need.

As with most quality of service concerns, security is not a binary toggle but a continuum. Matching the response to the need is a good way to stay on the right side of the law of unintended consequences.

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One thought on “Law of Unintended Consequences – Security Edition

  1. Pingback: Fixing IT – Remembering What They’re Paying For | Form Follows Function

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