Fixing IT – Microservices and DevOps to the Rescue?

Eberhard Wolff‘s question set the stage.

Adrian CockCroft‘s reply tied everything together.

Conway’s Law is the common thread tying microservice architectures (MSAs) and DevOps together. Significantly, this common thread runs through the entire organization, not just the IT parts. As I noted in my previous post, paying attention to this principle allows you to work with, rather than against, the grain of an organization. Working with the grain of the organization is key, because DevOps, lovely as it is, is not an end, but a means. The desired end, as identified by Mike Kavis in “Is DevOps What Organizations Really Seek?” is to “become high-performing organizations”.

Of all the attributes of such an organization (as identified by Kavis): “Strong Leadership”, “Strong Culture”, “Sound Architecture”, etc., the most important is “High Customer Satisfaction”. For many organizations, high customer satisfaction is a problem area for IT. In a recent article on Business Insider, Red Hat’s CEO Jim Whitehurst noted an increased interest in DevOps on the part of CIOs to deal with what he terms IT’s “fight for its life”:

That’s because IT departments say they had better figure out how to be faster, cheaper, and better. If they don’t, the company’s employees will no longer depend on them. They bring their own PCs, tablets and phones to work and they buy whatever cloud services they want to do their jobs. And the CIO will find his budget increasingly shifted to other manager’s pockets.

IT has has a history of cycles of neglect or rejection of new/disruptive technologies followed by catch-up crises: PCs in the 80s, Web in the 90s, BYOD/Cloud/IOT/etc. now. What’s different this time is the increasing level of technical knowledge and access to solutions outside of IT. As Krishnan Subramanian has noted, playing catch-up may become less and less viable:

MSAs enable flexible applications via composing vertical slices of business functionality rather than horizontal layers of technical concerns. These same principles can apply to higher levels of abstraction up to the enterprise’s IT architecture. Likewise, DevOps incorporates the same viewpoint shift in terms of the IT organization. This architectural change (both technical and business) can allow for integration between IT and the business it enables. As Twila Day recently noted, this integration goes far beyond mere alignment into “active partnership between IT and your business units”:

Partnership means working together, side by side. It means that technology leaders are actively involved in strategic development at the highest levels of your organization. It means that all the way up and down your organization, any talented person can propose an innovative idea, tactic or strategy, regardless of where s/he works. The business might have an idea first, or IT might have it first. No matter. What’s important is that the two groups work side by side to accomplish the most important business objectives.

Transforming IT from an adversary into a partner is primarily a cultural shift that involves both parties if it’s to be successful. Organizational and technical architecture cannot be neglected, however, in that they can either help or hinder that transformation. DevOps can facilitate this via its focus on the product rather than any one project (which is a concern shared by the customers) and by having the flexibility to tailor its pace to that of the customer rather than forcing a one size fits all (aka one size fits none).

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3 thoughts on “Fixing IT – Microservices and DevOps to the Rescue?

  1. Generally when partnership is discussed we seem to focus on making sure technology leadership is part of the head table. I would suggest that all groups, business, technology or ops often resist building partnerships. Cross functional only works if everyone is perceived to be first class citizens.

    PS – great entry!

    Like

    • Thanks!

      I’m glad I didn’t get the chance to answer this until I’d read your post from last night. It captures an important part of establishing that partnership process – the customer’s ability to switch. Being able to walk away from a provider on the one hand and being a paying customer (chargebacks) on the other helps to align the interests of both parties.

      Like

  2. Pingback: Form Follows Function on SPaMCast 347 | Form Follows Function

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