Quick Fixes That Last a Lifetime

Move Fast and Break Things on xkcd

“Move fast and break things.”

“Fail fast.”

“YAGNI.”

“Go with the simplest thing that can possibly work.”

I’ve written previously about my dislike for simplistic sound-bite slogans. Ideas that have real merit under the appropriate circumstances can be deadly when stripped of context and touted as universal truths. As Tom Graves noted in his recent post “Fail, to learn”, it’s not about failing, it’s about learning. We can’t laugh at cargo cultists building faux airports to lure the planes back while we latch on to naive formulas for success in complex undertakings without a clue as to how they’re supposed to work.

The concepts of emergent design and emergent architecture are cases in point. Some people contend that if you do the simplest thing that could possibly work, “The architecture follows immediately from that: the architecture is just the accumulation of these small steps”. It is trivially true that an architecture will emerge under those circumstances. What is unclear (and unexplained) is how a coherent architecture is supposed to emerge without any consideration for the higher levels of scope. Perhaps the intent is to replicate Darwinian evolution. If so, that would seem to ignore the fact that Darwinian evolution occurs over very long time periods and leaves a multitude of bodies in its wake. While the species (at least those that survive) ultimately benefit, individuals may find the process harsh. If the fittest (most adaptable, actually) survive, that leaves a bleaker future for those that are less so. Tipping the scales by designing for more than the moment seems prudent.

Distributed systems find it even more difficult to evolve. Within the boundary of a single application, moving fast and breaking things may not be fatal (systems dealing with health, safety, or finance are likely to be less tolerant than social networks and games). With enough agility, unfavorable mutations within an application can be responded to and remediated relatively quickly. Ill-considered design decisions that cross system boundaries can become permanent problems when cost and complexity outweigh the benefits of fixing them. There is a great deal of speculation that the naming of Windows 10 was driven by the number of potential issues that would be created by naming it Windows 9. Allegedly, Microsoft based its decision on not triggering issues caused by short-sighted decisions on the part of developers external to Microsoft. As John Cook noted:

Many think this is stupid. They say that Microsoft should call the next version Windows 9, and if somebody’s dumb code breaks, it’s their own fault.

People who think that way aren’t billionaires. Microsoft got where it is, in part, because they have enough business savvy to take responsibility for problems that are not their fault but that would be perceived as being their fault.

It is naive, particularly with distributed applications, to act as if there are no constraints. Refactoring is not free, and consumers of published interfaces create inertia. While it would be both expensive and ultimately futile to design for every circumstance, no matter how improbable, it is foolish to ignore foreseeable issues and allow a weakness to become a “standard”. There is a wide variance between over-engineering/gold-plating (e.g. planting land mines in my front yard just in case I get attacked by terrorists) and slavish adherence to a slogan (e.g. waiting to install locks on my front door until I’ve had something stolen because YAGNI).

I can move fast and break things by wearing a blindfold while driving, but that’s not going to get me anywhere, will it?

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7 thoughts on “Quick Fixes That Last a Lifetime

  1. Pingback: Form Follows Function on SPaMCAST 315 | Form Follows Function

  2. Pingback: Modeling the Evolution of Software Architecture | Form Follows Function

  3. Pingback: Design? Security and Privacy? YAGNI | IasaGlobal

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